Overview

Training, consulting and analysis services

We provide a range of services in association with Qualitative Data Analysis Services (QDAS). All our work is based on the principles of Five-Level QDA. This has proven effective in ensuring projects are successful from start to finish, and that after our work together you are well-positioned to continue harnessing a CAQDAS package to produce high-quality QDA.

We offer three areas of service

QDA Consulting  QDA Training Courses  QDA Data Analysis
                          

Online QDA Training

Nick focuses on online training & coaching, project consulting, and data analysis services, using ATLAS.ti. Contact Nick by email.

Face-to-face Training Workshops

Christina focuses on face-to-face training workshops, as well as online training & coaching, project consulting, and data analysis services using all major CAQDAS packages. Contact Christina by email.

Our colleagues at QDAS may also be more suited to a particular project, or may join one of us in assisting you. All our services are customized to your needs, and we will begin by working with you to decide the best way to serve you. Visit QDAS for further information about our services and colleagues.  

Testimonials

Thanks again for a great session! I really can't imagine how we could have proceeded without this kind of in depth training. Now on to the real work...
Jennifer Sweeney, MSLS, PhD
School of Education, University of California, Davis

Blog

A CAQDAS horror story: when tactics drive strategies

A CAQDAS horror story: when tactics drive strategies
By Christina Silver on Mar 22, 2018 at 06:52 PM

A key principle of the 5LQDA method is that analytic strategies drive software tactics. This ensures that software use is always focused on the objectives of the study and is appropriate to the particular methodological context.

But what happens when software tactics drive analytic strategies? Here is the most extreme example I’ve observed. In my next post I’ll discuss when software tactics can usefully inform analytic strategies without actually driving the process.

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How many codes are needed in a qualitative analysis?

How many codes are needed in a qualitative analysis?
By Christina Silver on Feb 22, 2018 at 08:53 AM in CAQDAS commentary

There is no answer to this perennial question not even any guidelines. You need as many codes as you need in other words, however many are needed to capture whats going on in the data in relation to your analytic focus and research objectives. How many depends on what youre using the codes to represent, how you derive them, and how you intend to use them in the analysis. Ive done substantial projects with as few as 22 codes, and others that required several hundred.

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My first thoughts on the Five-Level QDA textbooks

My first thoughts on the Five-Level QDA textbooks
By Five Level QDA on Feb 06, 2018 at 07:29 AM in Five-Level QDA issues & ideas

Ann Lewins has been using and teaching CAQDAS packages since 1994 and she pioneered the development of institutional support for their use in the UK, helping to create the CAQDAS Networking Project. Here she shares her first thoughts on the Five-Level QDA textbooks.

Five-Level QDA is a new teaching and learning initiative that aims to fill a huge gap by addressing some of the major dilemmas facing especially new qualitative researchers

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Methods matter - illustrating quality in qualitative analysis and the role of CAQDAS

Methods matter - illustrating quality in qualitative analysis and the role of CAQDAS
By Christina Silver on Jan 06, 2018 at 11:28 AM in CAQDAS commentary

Professor Debra Jacksons post about the Journal of Child & Family Studies intention to from now on only review and publish quantitative papers and the discussion it prompted on Twitter indicates how important it is for qualitative researchers to fully describe their methods and illustrate the quality of their analysis. Using dedicated CAQDAS packages to facilitate analysis wont necessarily result in higher quality outputs, but they can be used to illustrate process and rigour, and thereby have an important role to play.

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Coding is a process, not an event

Coding is a process, not an event
By Christina Silver on Nov 21, 2017 at 06:04 PM in CAQDAS commentary

What lies behind the red flag question: Ive done all my coding now what? In my last blogpost I considered the first likely culprit: starting to code before thinking through its purpose. But thinking about the purpose isnt enough. A second issue is the need to think about coding as an on-going process not as a single event that gets done before moving on to the next event. Coding is the opportunity to repeatedly connect with our data.

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