Project Consulting

in CAQDAS Packages

Project Consulting in CAQDAS Packages

Our involvement in team and funded research projects varies greatly from project to project. For some projects we serve only as outside consultants. This typically involves participating in the initial design of the data analysis and the consequent set up of the project in the chosen software, initial training of team members in the needed software skills, and then continuing on an as needed basis to provide guidance and advice at turning points of the data analysis, and provide additional software training and coaching on an as-needed basis.

For other projects we are more involved as a team member, participating in or leading the data analysis, and training and coaching the researchers in whatever features of the program they need to use. With some projects we undertake the entire data analysis ourselves, and participate in the writing of the resulting papers. We have been involved in a range of projects, from evaluations to grounded theory studies, including studies in  family medicine, public health, education, and leadership and management studies.

Using CAQDAS packages for collaborative data analysis

Using CAQDAS packages for collaborative data analysis is rewarding if the procedures are well-designed, but problematic if approached in the same manner as lone research. We are experienced in consulting to collaborative analysis projects, having served as project managers or principal data analysts in many regional, national, and international qualitative and evaluation studies in diverse areas of the human sciences. Details and references are available on request.

Testimonials

Christina's sessions were excellent and very well received. Feedback demonstrates that the students and staff who attended the sessions really benefited from and appreciated them. Thank you, once again, for preparing and delivering, what was clearly, a very successful package of training.
Rachel Torr, PhD
Head of Researcher Development University of Exeter Doctoral College

Blog

Methods matter - illustrating quality in qualitative analysis and the role of CAQDAS

Methods matter - illustrating quality in qualitative analysis and the role of CAQDAS
By Christina Silver on Jan 06, 2018 at 11:28 AM in CAQDAS commentary

Professor Debra Jackson’s post about the Journal of Child & Family Studies’ intention to from now on only review and publish quantitative papers and the discussion it prompted on Twitter indicates how important it is for qualitative researchers to fully describe their methods and illustrate the quality of their analysis. Using dedicated CAQDAS packages to facilitate analysis won’t necessarily result in higher quality outputs, but they can be used to illustrate process and rigour, and thereby have an important role to play.

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Coding is a process, not an event

Coding is a process, not an event
By Christina Silver on Nov 21, 2017 at 06:04 PM in CAQDAS commentary

What lies behind the red flag question: “I’ve done all my coding – now what?” In my last blogpost I considered the first likely culprit: starting to code before thinking through its purpose. But thinking about the purpose isn’t enough. A second issue is the need to think about coding as an on-going process – not as a single event that gets “done” before moving on to the next event. Coding is the opportunity to repeatedly connect with our data.

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"OK I've done all my coding. What's next?" Err, didn't you plan that already?

By Christina Silver on Nov 07, 2017 at 10:47 AM in CAQDAS commentary

Yet again this week I was asked the red flag question in a CAQDAS workshop: “Coding’s done. Now what?” This flags the inappropriate use of CAQDAS: no analytic planning done before plunging into helter-skelter coding. In this post and the next I’ll deal with the two underlying problems: starting to code without thinking about its purpose, and thinking of coding as an event rather than a process. Taken together these can result in a mass of codes that don’t lead to a thoughtful response to the research question. First: how to think about the purpose of coding.

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Translation in Five-Level QDA: What's in a name? Actually, quite a lot

Translation in Five-Level QDA: What's in a name? Actually, quite a lot
By Nicholas Woolf on Jul 07, 2017 at 07:00 PM in Five-Level QDA in practice

“Translation” is the key concept in our Five-Level QDA method, so it’s important to know what it means. The word just showed up in the title of Susanne Friese’s blog post on the ATLAS.ti website – “Translating the process of open/initial coding in Grounded Theory” – and Susanne ended by inviting readers “to read more about this process of translation” in our textbooks on the Five-Level QDA method coming from Routledge in September. But as Susanne uses the word “translation” in a very different way from us we want to clear it up right away.

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Don't lose your analytic reflections: The value of writing spaces in CAQDAS packages

Don't lose your analytic reflections: The value of writing spaces in CAQDAS packages
By Christina Silver on Jun 17, 2017 at 09:30 AM in CAQDAS commentary

Writing spaces are one of the most valuable features of dedicated CAQDAS packages. But I often see projects that make little use of them. Here’s why they are so potentially powerful.

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