Nicholas Woolf and Christina Silver's publications 

Publications

Nicholas Woolf's publications

Silver, C., & Woolf, N. H. (2015). From guided instruction to facilitation of learning: The development of Five-level QDA as a CAQDAS pedagogy that explicates the practices of expert users. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 18(5).

Chilton, M. M., Rabinowich, J. R., & Woolf, N. H. (2014). Very low food security in the USA is linked with exposure to violence. Public health nutrition, 17(01), 73-82.

Woolf, N. H. (2014). Analytic strategies and analytic tactics. Keynote address at ATLAS.ti User Conference 2013: Fostering Dialog on Qualitative Methods, Technische Universität Berlin. Retrieved from http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:kobv:83-opus4-44159

Woolf, N. H. & Yim, J. M. J. (2012). The Courtroom-Observation Program of the Utah Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission. Court Review, 47(4), 84-91.

McKenzie, J., Woolf, N. H., VanWinklen, C., & Morgan, C. (2009). Cognition in strategic decision-making: A model of non-conventional thinking capacities for complex situations. Management Decision, 47(2), 209 - 232

Woolf, N. H. & Quinn, J. (2009). Learners’ perceptions of instructional design practice in a situated learning activity. Educational Technology Research and Development, 57(1), 25-43

Woolf, N. H., Burns, M. E., Bosworth, T. W., & Fiore, M. C. (2006). Purchasing health insurance coverage for smoking cessation treatment: Employers describe the most influential information in this decision. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 8(6), 1-9.

Rodriguez, M., Wallace, S., Woolf, N. H., & Mangione, C. (2006). Mandatory Reporting of Elder Abuse: Between a Rock and a Hard Place. Annals of Family Medicine, 4(5), 403-409.

Woolf, N. H. & Quinn, J. (2001). Evaluating peer review in an introductory instructional design course. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 14(2), 3-26.

Lohman , M. C. & Woolf, N. H. (2001). Self-initiated learning activities of experienced public school teachers: Methods, sources, and relevant organizational influences. Teachers and teaching: theory and practice, 7(1), 59-74

Woolf, N. H. (2000). Report on interviews with women of color in the legal profession for the Utah Task Force on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Legal System. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah, Social Research Institute.

Woolf, N. H. (2000). Report on interviews with attorneys and judges for the Utah Task Force on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Legal System. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah, Social Research Institute.

Woolf, N. H., Harrison, R. S., Parsons, B. V., & McPhee, S. (1999). Report on the Public Hearings of the Utah Task Force on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Legal System. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah, Social Research Institute.

Lohman, M.C. & Woolf, N.H. (1998). Toward a culture of learning in the public schools: A human resource development perspective. Teaching and Change, 5(3-4), 276-293.

Christina Silver's publications

Publications 2

Christina Silver & Nicholas H. Woolf From guided-instruction to facilitation of learning: the development of Five-level QDA  as a CAQDAS pedagogy that explicates the practices of expert users. International Journal of Social Research Methodology. Volume 18, Issue 5

Christina Silver & Christine Rivers (2015) The CAQDAS Postgraduate Training Model: an interplay between methodological awareness, analytic adeptness and technological proficiency. International Journal of Social Research Methodology

Christina Silver & Ann Lewins (2014, 2nd Edition) Using Software in Qualitative Research : A Step-by-Step Guide, Sage Publications

Christina Silver & Jennifer Patashnick (2011) ‘Finding Fidelity : Advancing Audiovisual Analysis using Software’, FQS 12(1), Thematic Issue: Is Qualitative Software Really Comparable?

Christina Silver & Ann Lewins (2010) ‘Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis’ in Penelope Peterson, Eva Baker, Barry McGaw (Editors), International Encyclopedia of Education, Vol 6, pp 326-334. Oxford: Elsevier

Christina Silver & Nigel Fielding (2008) Using Computer Packages in Qualitative Research, in Willig C & Stainton-Rogers W (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research in Psychology, London, Sage Publications.

 

Testimonials

So often I have attended training courses and wondered what I was doing there, feeling my life slip away into oblivion while I could be doing other more useful and interesting activities such as watching iron rust or paint flake. However, Christina's was superb. It was exactly what I had hoped for. Pitched at precisely the right level and presented in a very clear, engaging way. Being able to spend time having some real content and context given by someone who really understands the software and researcher's needs, along with a sensible amount of time to try things out and get help was great. I'm much more confident about getting to grips with my data now.
Paul Rause
Interdisciplinary researcher, Southampton University

Blog

No 'basic' or 'advanced' CAQDAS features

No 'basic' or 'advanced' CAQDAS features
By Christina Silver on May 13, 2017 at 09:25 AM in CAQDAS commentary

This blog post is a response to Steve Wright’s reaction to a post I made on Twitter: “There are no basic or advanced #CAQDAS features, but straightforward or more sophisticated uses of tools appropriate for different tasks”

Thanks Steve for starting this conversation – it’s really important to debate these issues, and fun too! The sentiment behind the Twitter post underlie the Five-Level QDA® method that Nick Woolf and I have developed. Our forthcoming series of books explain our position, so here I briefly respond to Steve’s comments.

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The Five-Level QDA method books are in production

The Five-Level QDA method books are in production
By Christina Silver on Mar 05, 2017 at 08:04 PM

We're really excited to have submitted to Routledge our manuscripts for three books on the Five-Level QDA method - one each for ATLAS.ti, MAXQDA and NVivo. Nick developed the theory and when we met in 2013 we realized that we had both come to very similar conclusions about the issues involved in teaching and learning to harness CAQDAS packages powerfully. We've since been working together to refine, test and write-up the method.

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Don't blame the tools: researchers de-contextualise data, not CAQDAS

Don't blame the tools: researchers de-contextualise data, not CAQDAS
By Christina Silver on Jan 07, 2017 at 06:26 PM in CAQDAS commentary

In an earlier post on CAQDAS critics and advocates I promised to provide evidence for my position that CAQDAS packages are not distancing, de-contextualising, and homogenising, as is sometimes claimed. I have already argued that CAQDAS packages actually bring us closer to our data, and given an illustration of how this can happen, so here I consider the de-contextualizing issue.

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An illustration of how CAQDAS tools can bring us closer to data

An illustration of how CAQDAS tools can bring us closer to data
By Christina Silver on Nov 14, 2016 at 10:49 AM in CAQDAS commentary

In my previous post I argued that using dedicated CAQDAS packages for analysis could bring us closer to our data, rather than distance us from it, as some critics suggest. Here I illustrate this by outlining how different CAQDAS tools can be used in to fulfil a specific analytic task, thus bringing us closer to data.

Let's imagine we are doing a project in which we need to generate an interpretation that is data-driven rather than theory-driven. It could involve one of a number of analytic methods, for example, inductive thematic analysis, narrative analysis, grounded theory analysis, interpretive phenomenological analysis'. Whatever the strategy, an early analytic task may be to familiarize with the transcripts in order identify potential concepts. There are several different ways we could go about fulfilling this analytic task using dedicated CAQDAS packages. Here I discuss three.

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Does CAQDAS distance us or bring us closer to our data?

Does CAQDAS distance us or bring us closer to our data?
By Christina Silver on Oct 01, 2016 at 09:29 AM in CAQDAS commentary

In an earlier post on CAQDAS critics and advocates I promised to provide evidence for my position that CAQDAS packages are not distancing, de-contextualising, and homogenising, as is sometimes claimed. So I'm starting a series of posts. First I'm taking the suggestion that the use of CAQDAS distances us from our qualitative data and illustrate why I believe the converse to be true. Here I outline my position, and I'll illustrate my argument with examples in subsequent posts.

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